The Last Season

Discuss your favorite wilderness related books. Share your favorite poetry, quotes and folktales. Here's your chance to showcase your creative side!
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ERIC
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Re: The Last Season

Post by ERIC » Fri Jun 02, 2017 7:57 pm

Cross Country wrote:Good point. I agree that I miss it a lot.
As you should. You've spent a lot of time in the hidden corners of the Sierra, were good at it, and bonus...you got to spend a lot of that time with your brood. Hard not to miss that. You inspire me to get my kids out there. Regret's a ****. You're lucky.


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Hobbes
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Re: The Last Season

Post by Hobbes » Sat Jun 03, 2017 7:13 am

Aside from TLS, Blehm is an accomplished (adventure) writer. He's able to spin a good yarn, whether it's the Sierra or the WoT. Actually, we're quite the minority; his biggest readership is military.

Interestingly, the same aspect of nostalgia is present in that market as well. I know it firsthand: One uncle was a career AF pilot/commander who was crushed when he was grounded. A great-uncle volunteered for WWI at age 16 (he was Canadian), he regretted being caught and sent home - talked about it as his greatest disappointment.

If a career/activity had a high adrenaline rush, required skill & discipline, and you happened to be good at it, then you can see the attraction of remembrance as you gradually 'age out'.

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Re: The Last Season

Post by Tom_H » Sat Jun 03, 2017 1:16 pm

Beyond its literal definition (aka denotation), the word addicted has a lot of negative connotation (figurative meaning). People become addicted to crack cocaine, which is not good for them. From a literal POV, you could say that we all are addicted to oxygen, food, and water, but that's not a bad thing. If someone wants to say (s)he has become addicted to the mountains, that's all well and good, but we shouldn't assume that other people experience everything in exactly the same way we do.

Personally, the mountain experience was an integral part of my life; I craved it; I savored it. I still have amazing adventures in my dreams, but I do not spend my waking hours grieving that I can't backpack any more. There is still so much to look forward to, particularly grandchildren. With the Sportsmobile, I will be able to explore hundreds of miles of quiet trails in Canyonlands NP, and many more in Death Valley during winter and spring. My legs can still walk through the surf; I can still hold my beloved wife in my arms.

The ability to carry a heavy pack is not the only thing you lose as you age. Other.....um......how to say this.........bodily functions......slow down and eventually try to stop as well. My wife is a breast cancer survivor. Estrogen stimulates tumors, so she is on a med that shuts down estrogen production almost completely. This changes a woman's physiology as well as mindset. My own plumbing is not what it once was and those little pills cause me to have an anaphylactic reaction. We still love each other like newlyweds, however, and that is something to cherish. Our relationship has taken a lifetime of very hard work, but the dividends of that are now paying off in spades. She is my soul mate and her presence makes my life overflow.

So yea, the mountains once gave me immense joy, but they don't have to be the only aphrodisiac of life happiness. I have more, a lot more joi de vie to experience, in so many venues, before I plan to depart this place. And I plan to lay claim to every bit of it! \:D/

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Re: The Last Season

Post by Jimr » Sat Jun 03, 2017 2:27 pm

I think the term "addiction" tends to be used for its oxymoronic affect. A negative connotation applied to a positive outlet. We are dependent on food, water and air, but that in and of itself is not an addiction, its a biology. We have a passion for being in the mountains, but it's not an addiction. The psychological property of addiction to a substance or behavior is usually (always) an anesthetic for emotional pain.
“Posterity! You will never know, how much it cost the present generation, to preserve your Freedom! I hope you will make a good use of it. If you do not, I shall repent in Heaven, that I ever took half the pains to preserve it.”

-John Adams

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Re: The Last Season

Post by Jimr » Sat Jun 03, 2017 2:55 pm

You can watch Radio Silence: Disappeared for free here

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x3pyutq
“Posterity! You will never know, how much it cost the present generation, to preserve your Freedom! I hope you will make a good use of it. If you do not, I shall repent in Heaven, that I ever took half the pains to preserve it.”

-John Adams

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Re: The Last Season

Post by oldranger » Sun Jun 04, 2017 10:38 am

Tom_H wrote:Beyond its literal definition (aka denotation), the word addicted has a lot of negative connotation (figurative meaning). People become addicted to crack cocaine, which is not good for them. From a literal POV, you could say that we all are addicted to oxygen, food, and water, but that's not a bad thing. If someone wants to say (s)he has become addicted to the mountains, that's all well and good, but we shouldn't assume that other people experience everything in exactly the same way we do.

Personally, the mountain experience was an integral part of my life; I craved it; I savored it. I still have amazing adventures in my dreams, but I do not spend my waking hours grieving that I can't backpack any more. There is still so much to look forward to, particularly grandchildren. With the Sportsmobile, I will be able to explore hundreds of miles of quiet trails in Canyonlands NP, and many more in Death Valley during winter and spring. My legs can still walk through the surf; I can still hold my beloved wife in my arms.

The ability to carry a heavy pack is not the only thing you lose as you age. Other.....um......how to say this.........bodily functions......slow down and eventually try to stop as well. My wife is a breast cancer survivor. Estrogen stimulates tumors, so she is on a med that shuts down estrogen production almost completely. This changes a woman's physiology as well as mindset. My own plumbing is not what it once was and those little pills cause me to have an anaphylactic reaction. We still love each other like newlyweds, however, and that is something to cherish. Our relationship has taken a lifetime of very hard work, but the dividends of that are now paying off in spades. She is my soul mate and her presence makes my life overflow.

So yea, the mountains once gave me immense joy, but they don't have to be the only aphrodisiac of life happiness. I have more, a lot more joi de vie to experience, in so many venues, before I plan to depart this place. And I plan to lay claim to every bit of it! \:D/
Well said! I think, though, that it hard for younger people to really understand what we old farts have to contend with. I think the key to happiness as we age is the willingness to adapt to our infirmities and to be well grounded in our relationships. Still looking for the helium filled pack that could litterally lift me up the trail!
Mike

Who can't do everything he used to and what he can do takes a hell of a lot longer!

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Re: The Last Season

Post by Cross Country » Sun Jun 04, 2017 12:11 pm

Reading what Tom H wrote was like reading about me. I absolutly agree with Old Ranger too.

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maverick
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Re: The Last Season

Post by maverick » Sun Jun 04, 2017 12:27 pm

Not an addiction, but an escape into a world unclutered by humanities rigid thinking (at least some of it still is), like a religious expereince, that has not been tainted by man, still pure, which unfortunately not many people get to expereince.
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Re: The Last Season

Post by rlown » Sun Jun 04, 2017 12:30 pm

"like a religious experience".. I'd prefer it's called a 1:1 with nature experience.. maybe its just the way I think..

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Re: The Last Season

Post by oldhikerQ » Fri Jun 16, 2017 12:22 pm

Loved the book. A very compelling read. I've gone back and reread it once now.
Thought about the lessons to be learned, but in the end decided that they don't really apply to me as I don't spend nearly enough time with my backpack as I have plenty of other commitments (work) and hobbies to keep me occupied.
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I — I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.
Robert Frost

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