2017 Fire and Smoke Impact Reports / Maps

Questions and reports related to Sierra Nevada current and forecast conditions, as well as general precautions and safety information. Trail conditions, fire/smoke reports, mosquito reports, weather and snow conditions, stream crossing information, and more.
Post Reply
User avatar
maverick
Forums Moderator
Forums Moderator
Posts: 10213
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 5:54 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

8/7 Indian Fire in GTW

Post by maverick » Mon Aug 07, 2017 4:24 pm

Inyo NF:
Crews continue their response to the Indian Fire. It is estimated to be 220 acres and 0% contained.
The fire is burning in the 2002 McNally Fire footprint in whitethorn brush and Jeffrey pine at 8,400 ft. Snags (standing dead or dying trees) present a substantial safety concern for fire crews, so a modified suppression response is being used. Three helicopters are being used to cool the fire’s edge and slow fire growth to confine and contain the fire.
There is currently no threat to life or property. Moderate fire behavior is being observed with the fire creeping between dead and down trees that fell after the McNally Fire.
The forest is extending the emergency closure of the trails to include:
• Casa Vieja to Red Rock Meadow via Jordon Hot Springs
• Casa Vieja to Red Rock Meadow via Lost Trout Creek (Beer Keg Meadow)
• Red Rock Meadow to Templeton Cow Camp
These closures are due to the fire and due to the substantial hazard created by falling snags. Hikers are advised to avoid this and the nearby area during the fire response. Fire crews are using Jordon Hot Springs for fire operations.
Smoke is visible and drifting into the southern Owens Valley near Olancha as well as areas throughout the southern Sierra.
The fire appears to be lightning-caused and ignited on August 2. It is burning in the Golden Trout Wilderness, near Indian Head Peak, north of the Jordon Hot Springs.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.


Professional Sierra Landscape Photographer

I don't give out specific route information, my belief is that it takes away from the whole adventure spirit of a trip, if you need every inch planned out, you'll have to get that from someone else.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, an HST member: http://reconn.org






User avatar
maverick
Forums Moderator
Forums Moderator
Posts: 10213
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 5:54 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

Several Lightening Fires in Yosemite 8/2

Post by maverick » Mon Aug 07, 2017 4:28 pm

Yosemite NP:
The thunderstorm activity over Yosemite on August 2, 2017 produced several hundred lightning strikes in the high country, starting numerous fires. Thunderstorms continue to be in the forecast for the remainder of the week which may produce more lightning and subsequently start more fires.

Empire Fire: N 37° 38.673' x W 119° 37.096' at approximately 7300 feet elevation
Size: 147 acres
Cause: Lightning
The Empire Fire is in the wilderness and was reported on the night of July 31st. This fire is being managed for both protection and resource objectives as allowed in Yosemite's Fire Management Plan. It is approximately 1 mile south of the Bridalveil Campground, between Alder Creek and Bridalveil Creek on a north-northeast aspect with an over story of red fir. Current fire behavior is creeping and smoldering in needle duff, burning in heavy dead and down timber, and backing and flanking on the NW and NE sections of the fire.
Fire crews are on scene assessing the fire. There is no immediate threat to the Bridalveil Campground, Alder Creek trail, and Bridalveil Creek trail. Future closures will be decided based on fire behavior.

Star King Fire: N 37° 42.965' x W 119° 29.588' at approximately 7800 feet elevation
Size: less than one quarter acre
Cause: Lightning
Strategy: Monitor, no threat to Little Yosemite Valley

Blue Fire: In the Blue Jay Creek Drainage at approximately 8800 feet elevation
Size: less than one quarter acre
Cause: Lightning
Strategy: Monitor

Jay Fire: In the Blue Jay Creek Drainage at approximately 8800 feet elevation
Size: less than one quarter acre
Cause: Lightning
Strategy: Monitor

Porcupine Fire: N 37° 49.336' x W 119° 34.720' at approximately 8050 feet elevation just off of Hwy 120 near Yosemite Creek Campground road
Size: less than one quarter acre
Cause: Lightning

Indian Canyon Fire: at approximately 7400 feet elevation half a mile from the north Rim Trail
Size: 1/2 acre
Cause: Lightning
Strategy: Initial attack will be suppression

North Dome Canyon Fire: N 37° 45.655' x W 119° 33.571' at approximately 7600 feet elevation off the Indian Ridge Trail below the ridge.
Size: 1/4 acre
Cause: Lightning
Strategy: Initial attack will be suppression
Professional Sierra Landscape Photographer

I don't give out specific route information, my belief is that it takes away from the whole adventure spirit of a trip, if you need every inch planned out, you'll have to get that from someone else.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, an HST member: http://reconn.org

User avatar
maverick
Forums Moderator
Forums Moderator
Posts: 10213
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 5:54 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

Indian Fire 8/9

Post by maverick » Wed Aug 09, 2017 1:35 pm

Inyo NF:
The #IndianFire is estimated to be 421 acres and 0% contained. It continues to grow slowly to the north and east. Three helicopters are being used to cool the fire’s edge and slow fire growth to confine and contain the fire.

The fire is burning in the 2002 McNally Fire footprint in whitethorn brush and Jeffrey pine at 8,400 ft. Snags (standing dead or dying trees) present a substantial safety concern for fire crews, so only aerial resources are being used at this time.

Fire behavior includes creeping, smoldering, and backing between dead and down trees with moderate uphill runs when slope and fuels align. Aerial resources are checking the fire’s growth during the day, however the fire continues to grow slowly overnight.

There is currently no threat to life or property.

The forest has implemented an emergency closure of the following trails:
• Casa Vieja to Red Rock Meadow via Jordon Hot Springs
• Casa Vieja to Red Rock Meadow via Lost Trout Creek (Beer Keg Meadow)
• Red Rock Meadow to Templeton Cow Camp
• Red Rock Meadow to Little Whitney Meadow
These closures are due to the fire and due to the substantial hazard created by falling snags. Hikers are advised to avoid this and the nearby area during the fire response. Fire crews are using Jordon Hot Springs for fire operations.

Smoke is visible and drifting into the southern Owens Valley near Olancha as well as areas throughout the southern Sierra.

The fire appears to be lightning-caused and ignited on August 2. It is burning in the Golden Trout Wilderness, near Indian Head Peak, north of the Jordon Hot Springs.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Professional Sierra Landscape Photographer

I don't give out specific route information, my belief is that it takes away from the whole adventure spirit of a trip, if you need every inch planned out, you'll have to get that from someone else.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, an HST member: http://reconn.org

User avatar
maverick
Forums Moderator
Forums Moderator
Posts: 10213
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 5:54 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

Butte Fire Sierra National Forest 8/67

Post by maverick » Thu Aug 10, 2017 12:01 pm

Sierra NF:
On Monday August 07, 2017 Sierra National Forest (NF) fire crews first responded to the Butte Fire, a lightning caused fire, located between Cargyle and Stairway Creeks in the Ansel Adams Wilderness.

Initial suppression actions have been successful in channeling the direction of the fire, despite active burning in steep, rugged terrain, with difficult access. As of this morning the spread potential for the Butte Fire is moderate, with an estimated 250 acres burned to date and 10% containment. Smoke is visible from the Mt. Tom lookout, and drifting to the east as reported by the Inyo NF.

Resources currently assigned to the Butte Fire are Crane Valley IHC, Trimmer Helitack H-520, a Type 1 Helicopter, and a Type II hand crew from the Sierra NF, Fresno 4. Due to the spread and potential for future growth a Type III Incident Management Team has been ordered and will take over incident command at 1400 today.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Professional Sierra Landscape Photographer

I don't give out specific route information, my belief is that it takes away from the whole adventure spirit of a trip, if you need every inch planned out, you'll have to get that from someone else.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, an HST member: http://reconn.org

User avatar
SSSdave
Topix Addict
Posts: 2512
Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2005 11:18 pm
Experience: N/A
Location: Silicon Valley
Contact:

Re: 2017 Fire and Smoke Impact Reports / Maps

Post by SSSdave » Thu Aug 10, 2017 3:46 pm

Could see smoke from that SNF Butte fire as I drove west back over Kaiser Pass late Tuesday afternoon.

User avatar
Pearl
Topix Novice
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2014 6:27 pm
Experience: N/A

Indian Fire 8/12

Post by Pearl » Sun Aug 13, 2017 2:35 pm

View of the Indian Fire from the PCT just north of Chicken Spring Lake on Sat Aug 12th. Smoke was settling into Horseshoe Meadow and Lone Pine. Cleared up on 395 south of Olancha.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
maverick
Forums Moderator
Forums Moderator
Posts: 10213
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 5:54 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

Picnic Fire (Mono Lake) 8/14

Post by maverick » Tue Aug 15, 2017 11:32 am

Inyo NF:
The Picnic Fire, near Mono Lake on Picnic Ground Road (BLM jurisdiction), is holding at 2 acres today. Numerous crews and helicopters responded with aggressive suppression to this new start yesterday near the community of Lee Vining. The cause of the fire is under investigation. Lee Vining also experienced smoke impacts from the fires west of the community with the South Fork Fire in Yosemite being the primary source. The Great Basin Unified Air Pollution Control District (http://www.gbuapcd.org/) issues a Level 2 Alert for the community.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Professional Sierra Landscape Photographer

I don't give out specific route information, my belief is that it takes away from the whole adventure spirit of a trip, if you need every inch planned out, you'll have to get that from someone else.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, an HST member: http://reconn.org

User avatar
maverick
Forums Moderator
Forums Moderator
Posts: 10213
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 5:54 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

South Fork Fire (Yosemite NP) 8/15

Post by maverick » Tue Aug 15, 2017 11:37 am

Yosemite NP:
Location: N 37°32 '15" x W 119° 35'54" - approximately 5100 ft elevation
Discovered: 8/13/17 2:30 p.m.
Size: 1613 acres Containment: 0%
Cause: Unknown
Fuels: Ponderosa pine transitioning to White fir
Strategy: Suppression
County: Mariposa

The South Fork fire is burning 1.0 mile east of the community of Wawona upstream of Swinging Bridge in the South Fork of the Merced River drainage. The fire is burning in the wilderness but is being managed for protection objectives due to its close proximity to the community of Wawona.

The fire was discovered at 2:30 p.m. on August 13, 2017. Tactics in use include helicopter bucket work, retardant drops and tanker drops mainly on the left flank of the fire.

Strategic objectives are containment of the west flank and keeping the fire north of the river for protection of the community of Wawona. Air resources, hand crews and type 3 engines are all being utilized.

The fire is burning in dense mixed conifer forest with areas of heavy tree mortality. Most of the projected fire growth is expected on the north and northeast flanks of the fire which is burning into the wilderness and away from the community. However, the fire also continues to back down the South Fork drainage.

Smoke is expected to be heavy in the fire area and adjacent communities and is likely to be very dense in Wawona in the evenings and mornings. Visibility may be impacted along Wawona Road (Hwy 41 extension) south to Fish Camp, Glacier Point Road, Yosemite Valley, Hwy 140 from El Portal to Mariposa, and Tioga Pass to the Mono Lake area.

Portable and stationary particulate monitors are placed in areas that are most likely to see impacts of smoke during certain hours of the day. The local air quality districts use the data from these monitors to issue air quality alerts and notices. Fire Managers are working with the local Air Quality Districts and will be monitoring smoke impacts to the community of Wawona, park and local communities. Community members who are sensitive to smoke may want to close their windows and doors and monitor the air quality links below.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Professional Sierra Landscape Photographer

I don't give out specific route information, my belief is that it takes away from the whole adventure spirit of a trip, if you need every inch planned out, you'll have to get that from someone else.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, an HST member: http://reconn.org

User avatar
maverick
Forums Moderator
Forums Moderator
Posts: 10213
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 5:54 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

South Fork Fire 8/21 Wawona Closure

Post by maverick » Mon Aug 21, 2017 10:58 am

InciWeb:
Size: 3,473 acres

Percent of Perimeter Contained: 10%

Estimated Containment Date: Sept 3

Projected Incident Activity:

12 hours: Mandatory evacuations will remain in place for Wawona. Fire remains active along the western and eastern edges. Crew continue to strengthen lines with firing operations located east of Wawona in Division A. Heavy inversions continue to ground aircraft until late afternoon. When these inversions lift, fire activity increases.

24 hours:
Mandatory evacuations will remain in place for Wawona. Fire remains active along the western and eastern edges. Crew continue to strengthen lines with firing operations located east of Wawona in Division A. Heavy inversions continue to ground aircraft until late afternoon. When these inversions lift, fire activity increases.

48 hours: Mandatory evacuations will remain in place for Wawona. Continue to aggressively suppress fire spread toward community of Wawona on the west flank of the fire.
Professional Sierra Landscape Photographer

I don't give out specific route information, my belief is that it takes away from the whole adventure spirit of a trip, if you need every inch planned out, you'll have to get that from someone else.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, an HST member: http://reconn.org

User avatar
maverick
Forums Moderator
Forums Moderator
Posts: 10213
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 5:54 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

Sequoia Lightening Fires 8/24

Post by maverick » Sat Aug 26, 2017 12:28 pm

Inciweb:
After an in-depth analysis of recent lightning-caused fires in the Jennie Lakes Wilderness and the Sequoia & Kings Canyon Wilderness, fire managers, along with Forest Service and National Park Service leadership, are now jointly monitoring three wildfires. A fourth wildfire, the Trail Fire, is being monitored by the Sequoia National Forest.
These fires currently pose no threat to life, property, improvements, or infrastructure. All four fires are located in designated wilderness areas where fire has naturally occurred for thousands of years.
By using this tactic, fire managers are greatly reducing the risk to firefighters by limiting exposure in rugged and remote areas of the forest and park. Additionally, both agencies are minimizing the use of firefighting resources during this critical time of year; allowing those resources to be available to respond to fires that do pose risks to life and property.
The status of the four fires and their respective jurisdictions are:

Comanche Fire
Current Size: 0.1 acres
Current situation: Smoldering
Jurisdiction: Kings Canyon National Park
Restrictions: None
Closures: None

Seville Fire
Current Size: 0.1 acres
Current situation: Smoldering, creeping
Jurisdiction: Kings Canyon National Park
Restrictions: None
Closures: None

Rowell Fire
Current Size: 0.1 acres
Current situation: Smoldering, creeping
Jurisdiction: Sequoia National Forest
Restrictions: None
Closures: None

Trail Fire
Current Size: 0.1 acres
Current situation: Smoldering
Jurisdiction: Sequoia National Forest
Restrictions: None
Closures: None

Smoke may be visible to those traveling in this area. Smoke and air quality management is of high importance to Sequoia National Forest and Giant Sequoia National Monument, and Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks. Visitors can visit www.valleyair.org to learn more about specific current air quality and forecasts for this area.
Both agencies have fire restrictions in place for various areas. For more information visit:
- Sequoia National Forest / Giant Sequoia National Monument: www.fs.usda.gov/sequoia
- Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks: go.nps.gov/sekifirerestrictions
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5535/
Professional Sierra Landscape Photographer

I don't give out specific route information, my belief is that it takes away from the whole adventure spirit of a trip, if you need every inch planned out, you'll have to get that from someone else.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, an HST member: http://reconn.org

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests