HST Community      Bikes in the wilderness

Bikes in the wilderness | High Sierra Topix  

Bikes in the wilderness

Grab your bear can or camp chair, kick your feet up and chew the fat about anything Sierra Nevada related that doesn't quite fit in any of the other forums. Within reason, (and the HST rules and guidelines) this is also an anything goes forum. Tell stories, discuss wilderness issues, music, or whatever else the High Sierra stirs up in your mind.

Re: Bikes in the wilderness

Postby balzaccom » Sat Dec 30, 2017 8:57 am

There are places where this seems to work. Henry Coe State Park near San Jose is open to both hikers and bikers, without much in the way of conflicts...but it's a huge park and for some reason doesn't get a lot of traffic of either type.

As a road biker, I usually avoid any MUT because of walkers, dogs, children, etc. I'll take the highway over that crowd any day....
Balzaccom

check out our website: http://www.backpackthesierra.com/



User avatar
balzaccom
Topix Fanatic
 
Posts: 1569
Joined: Wed Dec 17, 2008 9:22 pm
Experience: N/A

Re: Bikes in the wilderness

Postby Harlen » Sun Dec 31, 2017 8:53 pm

I am absolutely, emphatically, and positively certain that the vast majority of the Sierra (Deso, Yose, SEKI, JMW, Inyo) will not be opened to bikers. No one will allow that to happen. I can see Domeland wilderness, Sequoia National Forest-south, and many trails north of Tahoe being opened though. But that is only if they are accepted on a case-by-case basis.


We hope you are correct "Zacjust," but what do you base your certainty upon? Perhaps relatively well-used and passionately defended areas such as Yose, SEKI, JMW, and Inyo might be preserved from machines, but how will lesser known, and less well-defended areas in the country fair? I'm wondering about the Wind River Range (Daisy?); the North Cascades (Oldranger?); and the San Juans, the Sangres, and ??? on and on?! Recall that this is a National concern here.
User avatar
Harlen
Topix Regular
 
Posts: 379
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2017 9:13 am
Location: California
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

Re: Bikes in the wilderness

Postby Wandering Daisy » Sun Dec 31, 2017 10:33 pm

All the gun-toting cowboys on horses will simply shoot the bikers in the Wind Rivers. :lol:

More seriously, horsemen, outfitters, and NOLS are all powerful lobbies in Wyoming, and they are sure to fight a good battle to keep bikers out. There are lots of non-wilderness trails and roads that the few bikers there are, can now use. The Wind River Indian Reservation is private land, and even if they allowed bikers, the bikers would not get very far, since trails are no longer maintained and are full of deadfall. In fact, many of the "trails" in the Wind Rivers are infrequently maintained and not suitable for biking.

It is already different in the mountains near Durango, where my daughter lives. Mountain biking is REALLY popular there and many trails already allow bikes. In fact, the Colorado Trail (from Denver to Durango) already allowes bicycles.

I do not think that widerness areas far from population centers will have much of an issue with biking. These areas are not even used that much by backpakers.
User avatar
Wandering Daisy
Topix Junkie
 
Posts: 3712
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 8:19 pm
Location: Fair Oaks CA (Sacramento area)
Experience: N/A

Re: Bikes in the wilderness

Postby balance » Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:13 am

A bold statement sometimes attributed to Thomas Jefferson, but actually spoken before his time tells us, “The price of freedom is eternal vigilance.”

I believe in keeping the wilderness wild and free, and as natural as possible. Inter-generational justice.
User avatar
balance
Topix Regular
 
Posts: 197
Joined: Sun May 04, 2014 12:26 am
Experience: N/A

Re: Bikes in the wilderness

Postby Lumbergh21 » Sun Jan 07, 2018 10:10 pm

Quite a bit of stuff to read through here. A little personal background is that in terms of hours spent in an activity, I'm a hiker, road cyclist, and mountain biker a distant last. I live in an area that is great for hiking and mountain biking (getting worse with every road "improvement" they make for road cycling), and I have literally never had a problem with a mountain biker ever. Then again, I try to pay attention to what's going on around me, both when hiking and when riding. With regards to the person indignant about cyclists not yielding to hikers, it is a whole lot easier for me as a hiker to yield to a cyclist than the other way around. Rather than press my "rights" as a hiker, I do the smart thing when I HEAR (that pesky paying attention thing again) a cyclist coming and I get out of his/her way. I'll even have the decency to give a wave, and I invariably get a smile and a head nod or wave back. Behavior like this has a tendency to create a much better hike for me and ride for them. I'm guessing that a lot of people on here don't ride a bike. But, just think about who is more maneuverable, you on foot or the cyclist? Who has an easier time stopping or getting of the trail? I guess what I'm saying is just try to be nice.
While there are places that bikes don't belong and I believe that only trails suitable for cycling should be opened, what would the hikers be saying if they were banned from the many miles of trail built and maintained by cyclists? Maybe that isn't an issue for most of you, but it would certainly be a loss to me as a hiker here. I prefer the community of outdoor enthusiast around here that get along quite well with each other instead of a "mine, you can't have it" attitude that unfortunately, some people seem to be advocating. :tear:
Last edited by Lumbergh21 on Sun Jan 07, 2018 10:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Lumbergh21
Topix Regular
 
Posts: 205
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2016 10:11 pm
Experience: Level 3 Backpacker

Re: Bikes in the wilderness

Postby Lumbergh21 » Sun Jan 07, 2018 10:17 pm

rlown wrote:Amazing how a trekking pole can ruin a person's day when stuck through the front wheel..


Wow, that is completely uncalled for and just down right mean. Oh yeah, sever facial and/or upper body injuries, ha, ha, so funny. Yes, I am refraining from responding in kind.
User avatar
Lumbergh21
Topix Regular
 
Posts: 205
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2016 10:11 pm
Experience: Level 3 Backpacker

Re: Bikes in the wilderness

Postby dave54 » Mon Jan 08, 2018 1:48 pm

Lumbergh21 wrote:
rlown wrote:Amazing how a trekking pole can ruin a person's day when stuck through the front wheel..


Wow, that is completely uncalled for and just down right mean. Oh yeah, sever facial and/or upper body injuries, ha, ha, so funny. Yes, I am refraining from responding in kind.


Yes. Anti-mountain bike zealot Mike Vandeman spent time in jail and got a criminal record by assaulting a biker on a trail.
=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~
Log off and get outdoors!
~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=
User avatar
dave54
Founding Member
 
Posts: 973
Joined: Fri Oct 28, 2005 10:24 pm
Location: where the Sierras, Cascades, and Great Basin meet.
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

Re: Bikes in the wilderness

Postby oldranger » Mon Jan 08, 2018 1:53 pm

Lumbergh21 wrote,

I believe that only trails suitable for cycling should be opened,


Which for many of the mountain bikers I know means every trail, even nasty ones like Taboose or trails with 18" tall steps. These gals and guys are amazing and the bigger the challenge the more they are into it.
Mike

Who can't do everything he used to and what he can do takes a hell of a lot longer!
User avatar
oldranger
Topix Junkie
 
Posts: 2536
Joined: Fri Jan 19, 2007 9:18 pm
Location: Bend, Oregon
Experience: N/A

Re: Bikes in the wilderness

Postby rlown » Mon Jan 08, 2018 2:01 pm

I'm a little sensitive to cyclists being in the wrong place, now that vehicles have the 3' rule. I see many non-locals up here riding two-lane rural roads with no shoulders in unincorporated areas. It's flat out dangerous to both. We have at least 1 cyclist killed a month in Sonoma County by vehicle collision, esp in Spring and Summer. If the cyclists want bike lanes, fund them; If not, then cyclists shouldn't be on a dangerous road, especially with a 1 Ton hauling cattle to and fro their ranches.

I feel the same in the wilderness. Even polite people who run the trails for fitness will holler, "on your left." I appreciate that. If a cyclist is coming behind be down a trail, I might not hear the bike unless they slow down and say the words. I can hear a mule train behind me and then warn other people I meet to leash their dogs and move to the side.
User avatar
rlown
Topix Junkie
 
Posts: 6693
Joined: Thu Oct 25, 2007 5:00 pm
Location: Petaluma, CA
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

Re: Bikes in the wilderness

Postby Wandering Daisy » Mon Jan 08, 2018 2:58 pm

I have been approached by cyclists from behind and did not hear them until they were basically on top of me, mainly because I was not expecting bicycles. If I had to be 100% on the alert for bicyclists, to me, this would definitely cause me to be anxious most of the time, something I go into the wilderness to get away from! I think it is unrealistic to expect backpackers to be continually on the alert for bicyclists/ or bicyclists for backpackers. I really see the two on the same trail at the same time, incompatible.

Bicyclists and horses really do not mix. I know that many backpackers also do not like horses and could care less about horse safety. But I think this is a more serious issue than backpackers. Horses could spook and cause serious damage to themselves and their riders, as well as the bicyclist.
User avatar
Wandering Daisy
Topix Junkie
 
Posts: 3712
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 8:19 pm
Location: Fair Oaks CA (Sacramento area)
Experience: N/A

PreviousNext

Return to The Campfire



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron